Best Red Beans and Rice New Orleans

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

What’s all the fuss about red beans and rice?

Well, other than it being delicious, it’s a New Orleans tradition that has stood the test of time. Back in the old days, the women of the house would do all of the cleaning and laundry on Monday. Since this was a laborious and taxing way to start the week, dinner had to be something easy. The result? Red beans and rice on Monday, baby. Some places still respect the old ways by exclusively serving the dish on Monday, but not everywhere. Here are four of our favorite red beans and rice sanctuaries in the city.

OUR FAVORITES SPOTS

1518 N Lopez St
(504) 218-7888

It’s “by the track” because of its close proximity to the horse track. And when you’re done playing the ponies, slide by for some authentic New Orleans red beans and rice. Liuzza’s is keeping it old school and only offering the red beans and rice on Monday. Come find out why this place is ground zero for Jazz Fest.

2401 St Ann St
(504) 822-9503

Okay, we’re not trying to cause any controversy here. We know that Willie Mae’s is where you go for fried chicken, and we highly recommend you do. However, they’re also plating up some of the best red beans and rice in the city. Expect the classic bowl here without any meat. Once it’s all gone, it’s gone, so make sure you get here early.

3001 Magazine St
(504) 891-0997

Planning on doing some shopping on Magazine Street? Some red beans and rice will keep you going. Joey K’s has some award-winning red beans and rice, taking home the third place trophy in the Bean Madness tournament. These red beans and rice are served on a huge plate with andouille sausage.

219 N Peters St
(504) 525-4111

“Divine Food Until 2:00 am.” It actually says this beneath the icon of St. Lawrence, the patron saint of chefs. When the party is going into the morning and your craving for red beans and rice isn’t satisfied, St. Lawrence is here to bless your taste buds. These red beans and rice are served with grilled andouille, collards and a piece of cornbread on the side. Let us pray.

Best Restaurants Garden District

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

One of our favorite things to do is stroll through the Garden District.

The beautiful homes, the shade from the trees and enviable shopping stops make it the perfect spot to spend the day. When hunger strikes near the Garden District, there is certainly no shortage of options. These are just a few of our favorites.

OUR FAVORITES SPOTS
Atchafalaya
901 Louisiana Ave
(504) 891-9626

Ready to get your Sunday brunch on? Atchafalaya, or ‘winding river’ in the Choctaw language, is doing New Orleans cuisine “while pushing boundaries.” Part of pushing said boundaries is the epic Bloody Mary bar, with vegetables pickled in-house and mixes made completely from scratch. You can’t drink all day if you don’t start in the morning, right?

District
2209 Magazine St
(504) 570-6945

District has become well-known for its innovative and delicious donuts. (We’re not taking anything away from that. These donuts are what dreams are made of.) But District is a perfect spot for lunch, too. The sliders and burgers have been rated some of the best in the nation, and that’s kind of a big deal. The ‘croquenuts’ are sandwiches that use donuts instead of bread — and yes, they’re delicious.

Surrey’s Cafe & Juice Bar
1418 Magazine St
(504) 524-3828

Having breakfast at Surrey’s pretty much guarantees that the rest of the day will be amazing. Surrey’s is a bustling little cafe with lots of neighborhood chatter and art hanging on the walls. Local menu favorites include masterpieces like the Bananas Foster French Toast and the Crab Meat Omelette. Thirsty? All of the juice is organic and pressed fresh in-house. It’s considered acceptable to bring your own booze to pour into Surrey’s juice.

Dat Dog
3336 Magazine St
(504) 324-2226

You can get a hot dog just about anywhere, right? The crew at Dat Dog will be the first to admit it. The process is simple here … choose a sausage and the toppings of your choice. The dogs range from fresh alligator sausage to a sausage infused with Guinness. And with more than 30 toppings to choose from, you can create a new masterpiece every time you visit. Following a vegan or vegetarian diet? Dat Dog offers veggie and vegan dogs!

Turkey & the Wolf
739 Jackson Ave
(504) 218-7428

We love us some New Orleans poboys, but sometimes you want to stray from the path. Turkey & the Wolf has a menu chock-full of sandwiches and ‘not sandwiches.’ Don’t underestimate the kitchen here. They’re using techniques from the fine dining world to create some truly amazing sandwiches. And with craft drinks like ‘Hillbilly Hotbox’ and ‘An Extraordinarily Tall Child,’ it’s no secret that the staff like to keep things fun. (It’s not uncommon to have a line stretching down the street.)

Joey K’s
3001 Magazine St
(504) 891-0997

All of that shopping on Magazine got you feeling homesick? Joey K’s is making authentic homemade comfort food the Louisiana way. The daily specials are the real reason to get over to Joey K’s. Whether you show up for meatloaf on Thursday or the Creole Jambalaya on Friday, you’ll be glad you took a seat Joey K’s. Hot tip: Joey K’s also has some of the bean red beans and rice in the city.

Juan’s Flying Burrito
2018 Magazine St
(504) 569-0000

Is there ever a bad time for a burrito? Juan’s Flying Burrito boasts a giant list of burritos and tacos. All of the creations at Juan’s start on the grill and with fresh ingredients. And since no burrito is complete without a margarita, the margarita menu, appropriately labeled ‘Fly Dranks,’ is just as impressive. Just look for the donkey with wings — you can’t miss it!

New Orleans Tricentennial

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

As the biggest free festival in North America, French Quarter Festival is huuuuge – with 1,700 musicians in more than 300 performances spanning 23 stages.

The festival is free, and it doesn’t have a fence around it. It’s like a big family reunion … it belongs to everyone. But it gets crowded, because here in New Orleans, we’re a big family. (As many as 500,000 people attend each year.)

It’s located in Woldenberg Park, along the Mississippi River, in Jackson Square, at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, at the Old U.S. Mint and in other scattered locations across the (where else?) French Quarter of New Orleans.

The weather in April is unpredictable and can range from super hot and sunburn-y to chilly. Come prepared for anything. Umbrellas are good to keep off the rain or the sun.

Travel light, though, because you will be walking … walking … walking and standing and dancing. It’s best to leave your car at the hotel (safely parked by our valet) and walk or take the streetcar. When French-Canadian explorer Bienville laid out the city some 300 years ago, he didn’t plan for ample parking. The French Quarter is only a 10-15 minute walk from The Mercantile Hotel.

THINGS TO BRING
  • Sunscreen
  • Cash to support local food and drink vendors to keep the festival free
  • Rain poncho (get yours from The Mercantile)
  • Your kids! – There are children’s areas inside

Plan Your Experience

There are two approaches – tackle the schedule and find the bands you think you will most love, or just wander around and surprise yourself.

Woldenberg Park is where most of the big stages are, as well as the food and drink vendors. When you enter this area they will check your bags and prohibit you from bringing in your own drinks.

Check out the smaller stages scattered throughout the French Quarter (especially around the French Market). The smaller stages at the Old U.S. Mint are some of the best places to people watch.

Join the crowd on the grass in front of the stage, or throw a chair on Decatur Street and watch from the sidelines. You can also grab a table at one of the restaurants on the street and enjoy some fine food and a show.

Get the FQF app. For $0.99, you can have access to all the stage and food listings at the festival.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

The Food

French Quarter Fest is as much a food festival as it is a music one. Food stands serve small snacks from the best restaurants in town, so come hungry.

There are crawfish pies, pasta, gumbo, mini debris poboys, gooey grilled cheeses and so much more. Grab a Plum Street Snoball to keep you cool. If a restaurant serves a ‘gotta have it’ dish, chances are you’ll find it here.

PRO TIP: Send members of your group out to different food booths, then reconvene and share.

There are great local Abita beer selections, wines and walk-anywhere cocktails. But you will need your ID, even if you are far past your prime. (Be flattered.)

Bring cash for festival food and drinks for ease of purchase. Outside food and drink are not allowed. Never fear, this is like eating at the most fabulous restaurants in New Orleans without a reservation.

If you need to use the restroom, there are tons of Port-o-Potties along the Riverfront stage, and the organizers do a great job of keeping them clean. (Really.)

And if all this weren’t enough, when the sun goes down, there are fireworks over the Mississippi.

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

As the biggest free festival in North America, French Quarter Festival is huuuuge – with 1,700 musicians in more than 300 performances spanning 23 stages.

The festival is free, and it doesn’t have a fence around it. It’s like a big family reunion … it belongs to everyone. But it gets crowded, because here in New Orleans, we’re a big family. (As many as 500,000 people attend each year.)

It’s located in Woldenberg Park, along the Mississippi River, in Jackson Square, at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, at the Old U.S. Mint and in other scattered locations across the (where else?) French Quarter of New Orleans.

The weather in April is unpredictable and can range from super hot and sunburn-y to chilly. Come prepared for anything. Umbrellas are good to keep off the rain or the sun.

Travel light, though, because you will be walking … walking … walking and standing and dancing. It’s best to leave your car at the hotel (safely parked by our valet) and walk or take the streetcar. When French-Canadian explorer Bienville laid out the city some 300 years ago, he didn’t plan for ample parking. The French Quarter is only a 10-15 minute walk from The Mercantile Hotel.

THINGS TO BRING
  • Sunscreen
  • Cash to support local food and drink vendors to keep the festival free
  • Rain poncho (get yours from The Mercantile)
  • Your kids! – There are children’s areas inside

Plan Your Experience

There are two approaches – tackle the schedule and find the bands you think you will most love, or just wander around and surprise yourself.

Woldenberg Park is where most of the big stages are, as well as the food and drink vendors. When you enter this area they will check your bags and prohibit you from bringing in your own drinks.

Check out the smaller stages scattered throughout the French Quarter (especially around the French Market). The smaller stages at the Old U.S. Mint are some of the best places to people watch.

Join the crowd on the grass in front of the stage, or throw a chair on Decatur Street and watch from the sidelines. You can also grab a table at one of the restaurants on the street and enjoy some fine food and a show.

Get the FQF app. For $0.99, you can have access to all the stage and food listings at the festival.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

The Food

French Quarter Fest is as much a food festival as it is a music one. Food stands serve small snacks from the best restaurants in town, so come hungry.

There are crawfish pies, pasta, gumbo, mini debris poboys, gooey grilled cheeses and so much more. Grab a Plum Street Snoball to keep you cool. If a restaurant serves a ‘gotta have it’ dish, chances are you’ll find it here.

PRO TIP: Send members of your group out to different food booths, then reconvene and share.

There are great local Abita beer selections, wines and walk-anywhere cocktails. But you will need your ID, even if you are far past your prime. (Be flattered.)

Bring cash for festival food and drinks for ease of purchase. Outside food and drink are not allowed. Never fear, this is like eating at the most fabulous restaurants in New Orleans without a reservation.

If you need to use the restroom, there are tons of Port-o-Potties along the Riverfront stage, and the organizers do a great job of keeping them clean. (Really.)

And if all this weren’t enough, when the sun goes down, there are fireworks over the Mississippi.

St. Paddy’s Day

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

As the biggest free festival in North America, French Quarter Festival is huuuuge – with 1,700 musicians in more than 300 performances spanning 23 stages.

The festival is free, and it doesn’t have a fence around it. It’s like a big family reunion … it belongs to everyone. But it gets crowded, because here in New Orleans, we’re a big family. (As many as 500,000 people attend each year.)

It’s located in Woldenberg Park, along the Mississippi River, in Jackson Square, at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, at the Old U.S. Mint and in other scattered locations across the (where else?) French Quarter of New Orleans.

The weather in April is unpredictable and can range from super hot and sunburn-y to chilly. Come prepared for anything. Umbrellas are good to keep off the rain or the sun.

Travel light, though, because you will be walking … walking … walking and standing and dancing. It’s best to leave your car at the hotel (safely parked by our valet) and walk or take the streetcar. When French-Canadian explorer Bienville laid out the city some 300 years ago, he didn’t plan for ample parking. The French Quarter is only a 10-15 minute walk from The Mercantile Hotel.

THINGS TO BRING
  • Sunscreen
  • Cash to support local food and drink vendors to keep the festival free
  • Rain poncho (get yours from The Mercantile)
  • Your kids! – There are children’s areas inside

Plan Your Experience

There are two approaches – tackle the schedule and find the bands you think you will most love, or just wander around and surprise yourself.

Woldenberg Park is where most of the big stages are, as well as the food and drink vendors. When you enter this area they will check your bags and prohibit you from bringing in your own drinks.

Check out the smaller stages scattered throughout the French Quarter (especially around the French Market). The smaller stages at the Old U.S. Mint are some of the best places to people watch.

Join the crowd on the grass in front of the stage, or throw a chair on Decatur Street and watch from the sidelines. You can also grab a table at one of the restaurants on the street and enjoy some fine food and a show.

Get the FQF app. For $0.99, you can have access to all the stage and food listings at the festival.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

The Food

French Quarter Fest is as much a food festival as it is a music one. Food stands serve small snacks from the best restaurants in town, so come hungry.

There are crawfish pies, pasta, gumbo, mini debris poboys, gooey grilled cheeses and so much more. Grab a Plum Street Snoball to keep you cool. If a restaurant serves a ‘gotta have it’ dish, chances are you’ll find it here.

PRO TIP: Send members of your group out to different food booths, then reconvene and share.

There are great local Abita beer selections, wines and walk-anywhere cocktails. But you will need your ID, even if you are far past your prime. (Be flattered.)

Bring cash for festival food and drinks for ease of purchase. Outside food and drink are not allowed. Never fear, this is like eating at the most fabulous restaurants in New Orleans without a reservation.

If you need to use the restroom, there are tons of Port-o-Potties along the Riverfront stage, and the organizers do a great job of keeping them clean. (Really.)

And if all this weren’t enough, when the sun goes down, there are fireworks over the Mississippi.

Super Sunday
(The Last Parade)

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

On the third Sunday in March, which sometimes falls the same weekend as St. Patrick’s Day, New Orleans celebrates Super Sunday.

The Mardi Gras Indians gather at A.L. Davis Park, at the corner of LaSalle Street and Washington Avenue, before proceeding along LaSalle, left on MLK Boulevard, left on Claiborne, left on Washington and ending back at the park where it all began.

The Super Sunday parade traditionally starts about noon, finishing around 2:30.

March 19 2019

There are two approaches – tackle the schedule and find the bands you think you will most love, or just wander around and surprise yourself.

Woldenberg Park is where most of the big stages are, as well as the food and drink vendors. When you enter this area they will check your bags and prohibit you from bringing in your own drinks.

Check out the smaller stages scattered throughout the French Quarter (especially around the French Market). The smaller stages at the Old U.S. Mint are some of the best places to people watch.

Join the crowd on the grass in front of the stage, or throw a chair on Decatur Street and watch from the sidelines. You can also grab a table at one of the restaurants on the street and enjoy some fine food and a show.

Get the FQF app. For $0.99, you can have access to all the stage and food listings at the festival.

Rock ‘N Roll Marathon

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

As the biggest free festival in North America, French Quarter Festival is huuuuge – with 1,700 musicians in more than 300 performances spanning 23 stages.

The festival is free, and it doesn’t have a fence around it. It’s like a big family reunion … it belongs to everyone. But it gets crowded, because here in New Orleans, we’re a big family. (As many as 500,000 people attend each year.)

It’s located in Woldenberg Park, along the Mississippi River, in Jackson Square, at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, at the Old U.S. Mint and in other scattered locations across the (where else?) French Quarter of New Orleans.

The weather in April is unpredictable and can range from super hot and sunburn-y to chilly. Come prepared for anything. Umbrellas are good to keep off the rain or the sun.

Travel light, though, because you will be walking … walking … walking and standing and dancing. It’s best to leave your car at the hotel (safely parked by our valet) and walk or take the streetcar. When French-Canadian explorer Bienville laid out the city some 300 years ago, he didn’t plan for ample parking. The French Quarter is only a 10-15 minute walk from The Mercantile Hotel.

THINGS TO BRING
  • Sunscreen
  • Cash to support local food and drink vendors to keep the festival free
  • Rain poncho (get yours from The Mercantile)
  • Your kids! – There are children’s areas inside

Plan Your Experience

There are two approaches – tackle the schedule and find the bands you think you will most love, or just wander around and surprise yourself.

Woldenberg Park is where most of the big stages are, as well as the food and drink vendors. When you enter this area they will check your bags and prohibit you from bringing in your own drinks.

Check out the smaller stages scattered throughout the French Quarter (especially around the French Market). The smaller stages at the Old U.S. Mint are some of the best places to people watch.

Join the crowd on the grass in front of the stage, or throw a chair on Decatur Street and watch from the sidelines. You can also grab a table at one of the restaurants on the street and enjoy some fine food and a show.

Get the FQF app. For $0.99, you can have access to all the stage and food listings at the festival.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

The Food

French Quarter Fest is as much a food festival as it is a music one. Food stands serve small snacks from the best restaurants in town, so come hungry.

There are crawfish pies, pasta, gumbo, mini debris poboys, gooey grilled cheeses and so much more. Grab a Plum Street Snoball to keep you cool. If a restaurant serves a ‘gotta have it’ dish, chances are you’ll find it here.

PRO TIP: Send members of your group out to different food booths, then reconvene and share.

There are great local Abita beer selections, wines and walk-anywhere cocktails. But you will need your ID, even if you are far past your prime. (Be flattered.)

Bring cash for festival food and drinks for ease of purchase. Outside food and drink are not allowed. Never fear, this is like eating at the most fabulous restaurants in New Orleans without a reservation.

If you need to use the restroom, there are tons of Port-o-Potties along the Riverfront stage, and the organizers do a great job of keeping them clean. (Really.)

And if all this weren’t enough, when the sun goes down, there are fireworks over the Mississippi.

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

As the biggest free festival in North America, French Quarter Festival is huuuuge – with 1,700 musicians in more than 300 performances spanning 23 stages.

The festival is free, and it doesn’t have a fence around it. It’s like a big family reunion … it belongs to everyone. But it gets crowded, because here in New Orleans, we’re a big family. (As many as 500,000 people attend each year.)

It’s located in Woldenberg Park, along the Mississippi River, in Jackson Square, at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, at the Old U.S. Mint and in other scattered locations across the (where else?) French Quarter of New Orleans.

The weather in April is unpredictable and can range from super hot and sunburn-y to chilly. Come prepared for anything. Umbrellas are good to keep off the rain or the sun.

Travel light, though, because you will be walking … walking … walking and standing and dancing. It’s best to leave your car at the hotel (safely parked by our valet) and walk or take the streetcar. When French-Canadian explorer Bienville laid out the city some 300 years ago, he didn’t plan for ample parking. The French Quarter is only a 10-15 minute walk from The Mercantile Hotel.

THINGS TO BRING
  • Sunscreen
  • Cash to support local food and drink vendors to keep the festival free
  • Rain poncho (get yours from The Mercantile)
  • Your kids! – There are children’s areas inside

Plan Your Experience

There are two approaches – tackle the schedule and find the bands you think you will most love, or just wander around and surprise yourself.

Woldenberg Park is where most of the big stages are, as well as the food and drink vendors. When you enter this area they will check your bags and prohibit you from bringing in your own drinks.

Check out the smaller stages scattered throughout the French Quarter (especially around the French Market). The smaller stages at the Old U.S. Mint are some of the best places to people watch.

Join the crowd on the grass in front of the stage, or throw a chair on Decatur Street and watch from the sidelines. You can also grab a table at one of the restaurants on the street and enjoy some fine food and a show.

Get the FQF app. For $0.99, you can have access to all the stage and food listings at the festival.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

The Food

French Quarter Fest is as much a food festival as it is a music one. Food stands serve small snacks from the best restaurants in town, so come hungry.

There are crawfish pies, pasta, gumbo, mini debris poboys, gooey grilled cheeses and so much more. Grab a Plum Street Snoball to keep you cool. If a restaurant serves a ‘gotta have it’ dish, chances are you’ll find it here.

PRO TIP: Send members of your group out to different food booths, then reconvene and share.

There are great local Abita beer selections, wines and walk-anywhere cocktails. But you will need your ID, even if you are far past your prime. (Be flattered.)

Bring cash for festival food and drinks for ease of purchase. Outside food and drink are not allowed. Never fear, this is like eating at the most fabulous restaurants in New Orleans without a reservation.

If you need to use the restroom, there are tons of Port-o-Potties along the Riverfront stage, and the organizers do a great job of keeping them clean. (Really.)

And if all this weren’t enough, when the sun goes down, there are fireworks over the Mississippi.

Essence Fest

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

As the biggest free festival in North America, French Quarter Festival is huuuuge – with 1,700 musicians in more than 300 performances spanning 23 stages.

The festival is free, and it doesn’t have a fence around it. It’s like a big family reunion … it belongs to everyone. But it gets crowded, because here in New Orleans, we’re a big family. (As many as 500,000 people attend each year.)

It’s located in Woldenberg Park, along the Mississippi River, in Jackson Square, at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, at the Old U.S. Mint and in other scattered locations across the (where else?) French Quarter of New Orleans.

The weather in April is unpredictable and can range from super hot and sunburn-y to chilly. Come prepared for anything. Umbrellas are good to keep off the rain or the sun.

Travel light, though, because you will be walking … walking … walking and standing and dancing. It’s best to leave your car at the hotel (safely parked by our valet) and walk or take the streetcar. When French-Canadian explorer Bienville laid out the city some 300 years ago, he didn’t plan for ample parking. The French Quarter is only a 10-15 minute walk from The Mercantile Hotel.

THINGS TO BRING
  • Sunscreen
  • Cash to support local food and drink vendors to keep the festival free
  • Rain poncho (get yours from The Mercantile)
  • Your kids! – There are children’s areas inside

Plan Your Experience

There are two approaches – tackle the schedule and find the bands you think you will most love, or just wander around and surprise yourself.

Woldenberg Park is where most of the big stages are, as well as the food and drink vendors. When you enter this area they will check your bags and prohibit you from bringing in your own drinks.

Check out the smaller stages scattered throughout the French Quarter (especially around the French Market). The smaller stages at the Old U.S. Mint are some of the best places to people watch.

Join the crowd on the grass in front of the stage, or throw a chair on Decatur Street and watch from the sidelines. You can also grab a table at one of the restaurants on the street and enjoy some fine food and a show.

Get the FQF app. For $0.99, you can have access to all the stage and food listings at the festival.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.

The Food

French Quarter Fest is as much a food festival as it is a music one. Food stands serve small snacks from the best restaurants in town, so come hungry.

There are crawfish pies, pasta, gumbo, mini debris poboys, gooey grilled cheeses and so much more. Grab a Plum Street Snoball to keep you cool. If a restaurant serves a ‘gotta have it’ dish, chances are you’ll find it here.

PRO TIP: Send members of your group out to different food booths, then reconvene and share.

There are great local Abita beer selections, wines and walk-anywhere cocktails. But you will need your ID, even if you are far past your prime. (Be flattered.)

Bring cash for festival food and drinks for ease of purchase. Outside food and drink are not allowed. Never fear, this is like eating at the most fabulous restaurants in New Orleans without a reservation.

If you need to use the restroom, there are tons of Port-o-Potties along the Riverfront stage, and the organizers do a great job of keeping them clean. (Really.)

And if all this weren’t enough, when the sun goes down, there are fireworks over the Mississippi.

Audubon Aquarium

Arrive

Jun 18
2019

Depart

Jun 18
2019

Rooms

Who doesn’t love a day of fun at the aquarium? The Audubon Aquarium is an aquatic maze of wonders from around the world.

Start your underwater adventure off in the Great Maya Reef Exhibit. This 4,200 square foot exhibit makes you feel like you are in the middle of the sunken Mayan city, surrounded by lion fish, eels, coral reef and endless wonders.

Swim up to the surface and you will find yourself in the Amazon Rainforest Exhibit. This exhibit has been created to look and feel just like the rainforest with all of its inhabitants. There are plenty of payara piranhas and pacu fish in the tanks — probably don’t want to stick your finger in there! The tree-top loop lets visitors get up around the canopy where birds of the rainforest fly freely through the exhibit.

And now the moment most of you are probably waiting for — the penguins! They’re nature’s playful little butlers and Audubon Aquarium is home to over 20 African Penguins. You can watch these amphibious creatures waddle and dive through their exhibit. If you want to witness a frenzy, make sure you show up for the feeding times at 10:30 AM and 3:00 PM.

Want more of an interactive experience?

Reef Rescue is a virtual reality experience where players are tasked to help clean up The Great Barrier Reef. Reef Rescue is not only a blast for users, but it stresses the importance of reef conservation and taking care of our delicate underwater ecosystems.

Since we’re on the Mississippi, Audubon Aquarium has an entire exhibit dedicated to the aquatic life of the Mississippi. As you may have guessed, there is an alligator along with a bunch of his river buddies waiting to be discovered!

All of this and more awaits at Audubon Aquarium.

Audubon Aquarium is located at 1 Canal St, New Orleans, LA. For more information, visit the Audubon Aquarium website.